Enjoy the Giggle!

Sometimes it takes a little more work to find a good cartoon that isn’t political! Then again, sometimes, you just have need to return to the classics. Enjoy these from “The Lockhorns.”

Cushioning Your Fall After The Pandemic

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Earlier this month, MSN ran an article call “5 Money Lessons the Pandemic Has Taught US (so far).” I found it to be a very interesting read. My husband and I are retired and living on Social Security. So we have had to adjust our lifestyle to fit on a fixed income. But number one on this list may just have you coming to a screeching halt.

Putting 6 months of expenses in a savings account actually a good thing. Especially given today’s world. But my question to you is, “How are you going to accomplish that?” I did a quick check of what that would amount to for us, and nearly choked! I would need over $15,000 in the bank!

An obvious way is to start with a budget. I found this article on a Disability Insurance company’s website. And it is a good way to start. However, there is a lot of little things that you can do to boost those savings.

  1. Budget a set amount every month. This is the bare minimum to do. Just do a little math to determine how long it would take to save enough for 6 months.
  2. If you didn’t spend all of a budgeted amount, save the difference. For example, I budget $200 for groceries. If I don’t spend all of it, I need to transfer the money leftover to the savings account.
  3. Reduce bills where you can. For example, you may be paying for unlimited data on your cell phone. Do you really need it? Take a look, you may be able to lower your bill and save more money.
  4. Are you taking advantage of all the discounts you’re eligible for? My husband and I are both Veterans. I switched our car insurance a few years ago to USAA and brought our insurance bill down to just over $100.
  5. If you are leasing/renting your cellphone, check into buying it. We recently bit the bullet, paid off our phones and had a very frank discussion with our provider. By taking advantage of a program for Veterans, what had been a $325 bill became a a $100 bill, and we still have unlimited data.
  6. Take a look at all the items you have subscribed to. You may need to search through your bank statement to find all of them. If you aren’t actually using them, cancel the subscription!
  7. At the end of the month, if you still have money in the bank, transfer it to the savings account!

I have my doubts that any of us are going to be able to quickly save enough. The point is to start somewhere! Doing a little is always better than doing nothing.

Don’t Let Your Guard Down Just Yet! #COVID 19

Just about the time everyone thinks they can return to life as “normal,” the virus resurges and the death count starts rising again.

The CDC has stated time and time again, that “people wear masks in public settings and when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.” CDC Guidance

You would think that it would be obvious to everyone, there’s a right way and a wrong way to wear a mask.

This is a great example of the WRONG way to wear a mask!

Masks are recommended as a simple barrier to help prevent respiratory droplets from traveling into the air and onto other people when the person wearing the mask coughs, sneezes, talks, or raises their voice. This is called source control. This recommendation is based on what we know about the role respiratory droplets play in the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19, paired with emerging evidence from clinical and laboratory studies that shows masks reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth. COVID-19 spreads mainly among people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet), so the use of masks is particularly important in settings where people are close to each other or where social distancing is difficult to maintain.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover-guidance.html

Notice that they included “sneezing” in this list. Now think about what happened when you sneeze. Go ahead, I’ll wait.

That’s right, it ends up involving the nose! So not covering your nose 👃 doesn’t help much.

This is the correct way to wear a mask. And folks? We’re all going to have get on board with this if we’re going to get through this together!

Don’t Forget #Coronavirus #COVID-19

Now that so many adults are home 🏡 because they’ve either been laid off or they are working from home, I thought it would be a good idea to remind you of some of your normal tasks that you should still be doing.

Set the Alarm Clock

After all the time my husband and I spent in the military, I can say this without any qualm, your body gets accustomed to getting up at a certain time. Now I know it’s tempting to sleep in, but don’t do it. Keep getting up at the same time. The current employment situation will come to an end and you will get another job. So stay in the habit of getting up in the morning.

Shower 🚿, Shave 🪒, and Shoes 👞

Okay, I get it, ladies don’t shave every morning like the guys do, but you get my point. If you’re single or a childless couple, it’s so very easy to spend half the day in your PJ’s. Seriously, don’t do it. You will feel much better about yourself after showering and dressing. Not to mention, we’ve all seen the ads on TV 📺 depicting a person working from home and they’re only dressed nicely on the top that shows on camera. You don’t need to put jacket and tie on, but do put clothes on that wouldn’t embarrass your grandma 👵.

Sit down for at least one meal 🥘 each day.

Plan your meals and sit down to enjoy them with your family. Actually spend some time together. If you’re sitting down for supper, talk about how your day was. Sadly, this is something that needs to be pointed out to some families.

Volunteer your time to help others.

If your health allows it, consider volunteering in your neighborhood. There are so many people who really need a little help right now. Whether you volunteer to deliver groceries for a neighbor or spend some time sewing 🧵 masks 🎭 to donate to a local hospital 🏥, do what you can to make things a little better for someone else. It will make you feel better about yourself. Not to mention, it will help make your day go faster!

If you’ve been laid off, update your resume.

Everyone should have a copy of their resume. Take this opportunity to update it to include your most recent job. Don’t be afraid to acknowledge that you were laid off/let go because of the Coronavirus. Face it, you aren’t alone in that regard. If you learned new skills while employed, highlight them. Earned new certificates? Add them in! Even include any and all volunteer activities you participated it. Let employers know that you are willing to help wherever and whenever needed.

Reach out to your parents and friends.

For those who have the capability, make it a video chat. For your family, this can help keep everyone close. For your close friends, do the same thing. Social Distancing doesn’t have to mean social isolation. Plan to check in on older relatives regularly.

Finally

I have absolute faith that we will get through this. At some point in time, you will again be looking for work. Don’t be afraid to include any volunteer work you’ve done while home in your resume. Include any new courses you may have completed. Show prospective employers that you took advantage of this time to help others.