The Science of Good Cooking

Master 50 Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen (Cook’s Illustrated Cookbooks) 

Unlock a lifetime of successful cooking with this groundbreaking new volume from the editors of Cook’s Illustrated, the magazine that put food science on the map. Organized around 50 core principles our test cooks use to develop foolproof recipes, The Science of Good Cooking is a radical new approach to teaching the fundamentals of the kitchen. Fifty unique experiments from the test kitchen bring the science to life, and more than 400 landmark Cook’s Illustrated recipes (such as Old-Fashioned Burgers, Classic Mashed Potatoes, and Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies) illustrate each of the basic principles at work. These experiments range from simple to playful to innovative – showing you why you should fold (versus stir) batter for chewy brownies, why you whip egg whites with sugar, and why the simple addition of salt can make meat juicy. A lifetime of experience isn’t the prerequisite for becoming a good cook; knowledge is. Think of this as an owner’s manual for your kitchen.

Let me start with my humble opinion, you are going to love this book! After my hubby bought this book for me, we both took a quick look through it. Just that quick I found a recipe for shrimp that has become my “go to” for a quick weeknight meal. If you’ve never been able to get a pie crust to come out right, try the Foolproof Pie Crust in the back of the book. I tell you, it works for both myself and my friends. What makes for interesting reading is the explanation of “Why” it works.


Pokin
5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read to improve the results of your food!
Reviewed in the United States on September 22, 2012 Verified Purchase
Having relied on Cooks Illustrated recommendations for many of my favourite kitchen tools, buying this book was a no brainer. Needless to say I had high expectations going in, and this book did not disappoint.

I'm an avid cook, and while I've had great success with certain types of food, I've been frustrated by inconsistent results in others. (I can't seem to get a consistently moist pot-roast -- reason: my cooking temperature was probably too high; wrong cut of meat + oven braising is better than stovetop since it heats more evenly in more directions)

The Science of Good Cooking breaks down why food cooks a certain way, and which techniques are best for what purpose. The book is organized into 50 concepts with recipes reinforcing each concept. There's a section called "why this works" following each recipe, which breaks down the science behind each step -- for instance why use a certain type of marinade, cooking technique, take extra steps, etc to achieve a desired outcome. It's nice that it's not just a list of recipes.

Experiments back each concept. Meats were weighed, measured, smashed to determine tenderness, and moisture loss. They came up with a range of ideal resting times for various meats based on actually measuring the amount of juices lost at various times, and they sent food to the science lab to analyze their structure. They even stuck bones on mashed potatoes to test out whether keeping bones on makes food taste better. This book debunked some assumptions I had (acid does not actually make food more tender), and helped me understand other ones better - why salt directly applied on skin makes it more crispy, but if you brined the skin you'd get a different outcome. I also learned that the direction you cut your onion affects its taste - obvious in retrospect, but I never thought about that!

I was disappointed I couldn't see a table of contents before purchase, so here are the 50 concepts you will find within the book -

1. Gentle Heat Prevents Overcooking
2. High Heat Develops Flavor
3. Resting Meat Maximizes Juiciness
4. Hot Food Keeps Cooking
5. Some Proteins Are Best Cooked Twice
6. Slow Heating Makes Meat Tender
7. Cook Tough Cuts Beyond Well Done
8. Tough Cuts Like a Covered Pot
9. A Covered Pot Doesn't Need Liquid
10. Bones Add Flavor, Fat, and Juiciness
11. Brining Maximizes Juiciness in Lean Meats
12. Salt Makes Meat Juicy and Skin Crisp
13. Salty Marinades work best
14. Grind Meat at Home for Tender Burgers
15. A Panade Keeps Ground Meat Tender
16. Create Layers for a Breading That Sticks
17. Good Frying is All About Oil Temperature
18. Fat Makes Eggs Tender
19. Gentle Heat Guarantees Smooth Custards
20. Starch Keeps Eggs from Curdling
21. Whipped Egg Whites Need Stabilizers
22. Starch Helps Cheese Melt Nicely
23. Salting Vegetables Removes Liquid
24. Green Vegetables Like it Hot -- Then Cold
25. All Potatoes Are Not Created Equal
26. Potato Starches Can Be Controlled
27. Precooking Makes Vegetables Firmer
28. Don't Soak Beans -- Brine 'Em
29. Baking Soda Makes Beans and Grains Soft
30. Rinsing (Not Soaking) Makes Rice Fluffy
31. Slicing Changes Garlic and Onion Flavor
32. Chile Heat Resides in Pith and Seeds
33. Bloom Spices to Boost Their Flavor
34. Not All Herbs Are for Cooking
35. Glutamates, Nucleotides Add Meaty Flavor
36. Emulsifiers Make Smooth Sauces
37. Speed Evaporation When Cooking Wine
38. More Water Makes Chewier Bread
39. Rest Dough to Trim Kneading Time
40. Time Builds Flavor in Bread
41. Gentle Folding Stops Tough Quick Breads
42. Two Leaveners Are Often Better Than One
43. Layers of Butter Makes Flaky Pastry
44. Vodka Makes Pie Dough Easy
45. Less Protein Makes Tender Cakes, Cookies
46. Creaming Butter Helps Cakes Rise
47. Reverse Cream for Delicate Cakes
48. Sugar Changes Texture (and Sweetness)
49. Sugar and Time Makes Fruit Juicer
50. Cocoa Powder Delivers Big Flavor

The only thing I would have loved was a trouble shooting / Q&A section - e.g. How do you keep meat from cooling too much when you rest it?

Overall a great book if you want to improve your cooking technique, and also if you just want to learn more about why things behave the way they do!

Update: Looks like "Look inside" is now available for this book so there's finally a table of contents! 🙂 Since I've been cooking with the new concepts in mind, I'm happy with how my meat dishes (especially the stews) are turning out. I also tried using vodka instead of water to make pie crust (with the tip of putting a heated pan under the pie pan) and the pie crust turned out flaky and delicious as promised.

Maggie S
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Reference
Reviewed in the United States on December 13, 2016 Verified Purchase
I have four shelves of cookbooks in my kitchen with classics such as Julia Child's originals all the way to glossy offerings from 3-star Michelin restaurants. Despite this, one can be an excellent cook using only two cookbooks: "Cooks Science" and the "Joy of Cooking". Cooks Science is comprehensive and the discussions help make you a better more informed cook than the usual recipe-oriented fare. I give it four and not five stars only because some of the recipes seem to be "tacked onto" the broader technical discussions rather than drawing upon them. For example, a discussion about the importance of slow cooking pork is followed by several recipes that seem to ignore that counsel. It's not an exhaustive cookbook like Joy of Cooking, but does offer recipes in most areas and manages to hit most of the biggies. Still, these seem to be a minor quibbles with an othewise excellent text.

J. Boyd
5.0 out of 5 stars Choose your own adventure -- Excellence in Ebook format!
Reviewed in the United States on April 11, 2014 Verified Purchase
This is a fantastic cookbook. It's also a wonderfully entertaining education on the hows and whys - the science - of cooking. Every recipe I've tried has turned out well - and has taught me something. I own a hard-cover copy, and it has a place of honor on my kitchen bookshelf.

Then I bought the Kindle edition. Whoever formatted this book for Kindle has done a superlative job. The formatting actually enhances the reading experience.

For example - you are reading an early chapter entitled The Science of the Senses. In the first section (The Five Tastes) there's an interesting discussion of the fifth "taste," umami flavor. You can just read this and go on to the next section on How Taste Works. Or, if you want to understand umami a little more, you can follow the links in that first section to an in-depth discussion of glutamate and nucleotide levels in foods. This is Concept 35 - a section that is more than half-way through the book and yet meshes perfectly with what you read in that introductory chapter. The Concept ends with three recipes specifically engineered to show the best use of glutamate and nucleotides to produce rich meaty flavors -- AND with links to two additional recipes from yet another section of the book that also illustrate techniques associated with enhancing meaty flavors. It's a seamless reading experience that has you wandering through all different parts of this book.

When I first did this, I became a little alarmed. How was I ever going to find the recipes again? Have no fear. There is a complete and interactive table of contents. You can readily navigate to each of the "Science of.." chapters, or pick out one of the 50 Concepts and go directly there. In addition, there is a specific page of links that just lists all the recipes. So if you want to cook - hey, it works as a cookbook!

The Ebook version of The Science of Good Cooking reminds me of those "Choose your Own Adventure" stories - each time you dip in, you can follow a different path through. Kudos to the editors at America's Test Kitchen.

Edited to add:
The images in the book were clear, dark enough, and large enough be viewed very easily on my Kindle paperwhite. Tables were always correctly formatted, and fit the pages. The whole thing looked amazingly NICE and professional. Would that other ebooks looked so good!
Read less

The Sunday Post #21-9

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimberly @ Caffeinated Reviewer. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

Covid Vaccine

After seeing shots like this one on our local station, I wasn’t too sure about the whole process. Some of these folks waited for over 3 hours in their car even with an appointment!

But when the VA texted my husband on Tuesday offering vaccination shots, we jumped at the chance. And wow, what a difference. As we came on the VA campus we noticed that there was a separate lane designated for Covid appointments. Following the signs brought us to a separate temperate check tent. From there, we were directed to follow a path that led us back to the parking garage. The ground floor was set up with 10 or so small areas where 8 people at a time could be accommodated with social distancing.

Each area was identified by a service and a number. After looking around, this was just a handy way to identify where to go. There was a nurse and one other person there. We happened to have a doctor we knew as the second person. I can’t say for certain that each area had a doctor, but they might have.

They gathered your information and set up the appointment for the next shot right away. After you were given your vaccination, a small time was set for 15 min. This way they could keep tabs on you to make sure you were okay before leaving. We were sent on our way with a vaccination card and a monitoring record. If you had any side effects, you were to write it down and bring the sheet back with you for your next shot. We were done in about 30 min.

Now, when we arrived there, no line existed for parking. But by the time we left, a line had formed and was starting to wrap around the block. Hopefully, those folks didn’t have to wait very long. All in all, it turned out to be a pleasant experience!

Weekly Cup of Coco

This is the look I get when Coco wants a walk. She is so adorable when she prances around trying to get me to hurry up!

Enjoy the Giggle!

Church Sign Edition!

They are everywhere, church signs that is! On one side may be the times for the worship services, while the other side has a short quote of some kind. It’s these short quotes that can down right give you the giggles. After seeing one at a Hispanic Seventh Day Adventist church that I walk by on a daily basis, I decided to start including them in my giggle listings. Enjoy!

Ain’t that the truth!
The Gospel is not in quarantine

The Sunday Post #21-8

There may be affiliate links in this post. As an Amazon Associate, I may earn a small commission from qualifying purchases.

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimberly @ Caffeinated Reviewer. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

Decorating

This past week, my husband and I did something that we do about 4 times a year, we changed the set of dishes we are using. I remember how my mother loved to decorate her house for the seasons. Unfortunately, I don’t have the space to decorate that she did. She had a 3 story house, I have a single wide trailer. So over the years, I have collected 4 sets of dishes to use for the different seasons. This week we brought out the ones for spring.

Now, one of my husband’s greatest joys is buying me Crystal to use in our house. He’s wanted to do that for years but we were never in a position to afford it. Recently we have been. Last year, he bought me two things to use as centerpieces for the table. Godinger Swan Centerpiece Bowl Crystal Giftware and Godinger 25517 Dublin Hurricanes – Set of 3,. Those candleholders look like they hold votives, don’t they? Noooo, they hold 3 inch candles!

Christmas decorating using these was fairly simple. Red candles, red and gold ornament balls and 3 strands of holly wound around the base of the candlesticks. But look at how elegant they look! I got rave reviews all season long.

This week I changed that for spring. White candles, smaller flowers in the bowl, and 2 different flower garlands woven together then wound around the candlesticks.

Book Reviews for this Past Week

  • Saved By Her Dragon by Julia Mills
  • Planning for Canning
  • Deception by Anna Lowe
  • Fated by Delta James
  • Tamed by the Beast by Grace Goodwin
  • River Wolf by Heather Long

Weekly Cup of Coco

This week was Coco’s “Spa Day.” She’s not happy with me but accepted a rawhide chew as a bribe.

Planning for Canning!

There may be affiliate links in this post. As an Amazon Associate, I may earn a small commission from qualifying purchases.

Are you one of the many people who took up canning last summer as we were all home due to Pandemic? I noticed that there was an absolute run on all the canning supplies in every store that I checked. Now luckily I bought my equipment back in 2017 after Hurricane Irma knocked power down and I didn’t get it back for a week!

Folks, I’m Pennsylvania German and was raised to can with a Water Bath, that’s what my mom used. But if you are trying to can vegetables or soup, you need a Pressure Canner. My oldest daughter called me last year trying to find one for sale. At that time, they were selling for several hundred dollars!

So if you are planning to continue canning, now is a good time to start gathering your supplies. Besides the obvious jars, you will want/need:

  • Water Bath Canner – I found out the hard way that you can’t pressure can jelly and a pressure canner isn’t deep enough to do water bath with quart jars!
  • Pressure Canner – Note that I said canner, not Cooker. The USDA warns against trying to use a Pressure Cooker due to variations in pressure. This may not be a problem for cooking, but you need the consistency to kill all the toxins.
  • New lids – This is something else that can’t be stressed enough. When you opened that jar, you bend the rim to break the seal.

Recipe Books

The most trusted resource in home canning for over 100 years, the 2015 release of the Ball Blue Book is its largest update since the first edition in 1909. Expanding 56% from the previous edition, the 37th edition of the Ball Blue Book includes 75 new recipes, pictorial step by step guides for beginners, a special section for Meal Creations and unique “You Choose” and “Our Tip” recommendations where creative variations and helpful techniques are listed for creating your own signature foods

Canning Essentials is a go-to beginner’s guide that will take you step-by-step through the different processes of canning fruit and produce. From canning vegetables, like tomatoes and squashes, to preparing homemade jam, salsas, relishes, and so much more, this book simplifies food preservation so that even today’s busiest people can find time to do it themselves. Emphasizing cost-saving and sustainable food safety, you’ll learn methods for both freezing, canning, pressure canning, and water-bath canning, then discover over 60 delicious recipes for homemade jelly, chutneys, pickles, and more. With helpful charts throughout to detail methods with specific timings, temperatures, and required equipment, this book will teach you everything you need to know about preserving and canning fruits and vegetables.

Canning perfected the America’s Test Kitchen way.

The art of preserving produce by canning and preserving has come full circle from grandmother’s kitchen to a whole new generation now eager to learn it. This detailed guide to home preserving is perfect for novice canners and experts alike and offers more than 100 foolproof recipes across a wide range of categories, from sweet jams and jellies to savory jams, vegetables, condiments, pickles, whole fruits, and more. Let the experts at America’s Test Kitchen show you how to do it right with detailed tutorials, troubleshooting tips, equipment information, and insight into the science behind canning.

From the author of The Homestyle Amish Kitchen Cookbook comes a great new collection of recipes, hints, and Plain wisdom for everyone who loves the idea of preserving fresh, wholesome foods. Whether instructing a beginning canner or helping a seasoned cook hone her skills, certified Master Food Preserver Georgia Varozza shows people how to get the very best out of their food.

These are just a few of the books available to you. I should warn you, they will all cover the basic principles of canning safely .

The Sunday Post #21-7

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimberly @ Caffeinated Reviewer. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

Rant Time!

Being a veteran couple, my husband and myself fly a flag attached to the trailer. Last September I bought a new new flag, already attached to a pole, to replace my tattered one. The pole is nice and sturdy but the flag was a bit oversized. During most days it was fine, but when the wind blew, it got wild. This past week I finally gave in and bought a new one to replace it. Now I don’t know how I was expected to get the flag off those hooks but I had to get a pair of Pliers to squeeze the hook enough to wiggle the grommets out!! Enough Already! Face it, it’s the older folks and veterans who tend to use these. Make it a little bit easier to replace it!

New series coming soon to the blog

Okay, I’m looking at a couple of series to add to the blog. One, “The Wild Hunt Legacy” is a shifter series, but with a bit of a twist. Herne, God of the Hunt, and Gaia, Mother Earth, have a very large input into the way things are run. This is a series that I would have sworn was finished. The author recently added another book to the four already published, and in the last chapter gave me the impression that there might be more coming.

The next one, Dragons of Preor, is another I thought was finished. But again, the author is still adding to it. In order for things to make sense, I’ll need to include the first series, the Ujal. One series runs right into the next.

The other series that I’m considering are a great deal like Delta James’ “Wayward Mates” in that the males are firmly in charge, and the ladies will get their bottoms “warmed” for not obeying. Now, personally, I enjoy reading these types of books, but anyone trying it on me is in for a fight!

Weekly Cup of Coco

Coco’s new hiding place

While Coco has no problem going out in the rain, she doesn’t enjoy the sounds of the thunder. We’ve blocked off her access to behind the sofa and the bed, but being the resourceful little dog that she is, she found another spot to curl up in!

The Sunday Post #21-6

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimberly @ Caffeinated Reviewer. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

What’s new with me!

I’ve been planning to do this for quite awhile now, but never quite got around to doing it. Instagram, that is! I use the same handle, reluctantretireebookreviews for Instagram and Twitter both. I’ve started posting just once each day, until I get the hang of doing this.

I was surprised to see that sometimes an author will just post a quote from their book on a abstract background. This was not what I was expecting, but definitely something I can work with. I don’t take photos so much as I create 3d renders of the scene. I’ve got several different scenes set up that I can just change a few things, (along with the book covers) and it will render in just a few minutes. I’m not going for photorealism because that can take way too long.

Since I noticed that several of the series now have updated covers, I’m going through and updating the blog posts. You should already be seeing these. I’m trying to keep up with all the different series without just totally dropping any of them.

Lastly, I’m giving you a look at reviews written by people other than myself. I know that my reviews can be, shall we say, short? For the most part, I write reviews on my iPad and I just don’t care for trying to do long, involved reviews that way. So I try to give you reviews that look at things from a different perspective. These reviews may be recent or from when the book was published. Expect to see 3 – 4 reviews in each post.

Weekly Cup of Coco

As we age, my husband and I enjoy having our fur baby sleep with us. Some nights, Coco will stay, other nights she wants down. Thursday night was definitely a different gameplan! My nightstand lamp is just out of reach so I have to get out of bed to turn it off. That night I turned back around to get in bed only to see Coco settling in my space. I laid down anyway, thinking she would scoot further down in the bed. Nope, she crawled up on the top part of my pillow, and there she stayed all night!

Mediterranean Instant Pot: Easy, Inspired Meals for Eating Well

There may be affiliate links in this post. As an Amazon Associate, I may earn a small commission from qualifying purchases.

Bringing together the #1 diet and the #1 most popular kitchen appliance, this Instant Pot-authorized cookbook makes it more convenient than ever to cook the Mediterranean way, incorporating more vegetables, grains, beans, and seafood into your diet, and exploring the healthful, authentic flavors of cuisines ranging from Turkish to North African in everyday one-pot meals.

Made in the Instant Pot, succulent meals such as Chicken Tagine, Lamb Meatballs with Couscous, Pickled Onions, and Tahini, Shrimp and Asparagus Risotto, and Gigante Bean Soup with Celery and Olives become hands-off affairs for the busy cook. The Instant Pot also takes the waiting game out of cooking dried beans and sturdy grains so it’s easy to enjoy them more often. And vegetables get star billing, both as main dishes (Braised Whole Cauliflower with North African Spices), and sides (Marinated Artichokes and Baba Ghanoush). Recipes embrace the tenets of the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid, translating its less-meat-and-more-vegetables approach into vibrant, healthy one-dish meals that take the guesswork out of balancing portions and multiple dishes. Most recipes are ready in under an hour. And full nutritional information is provided.

Rating: 2 out of 5.

I bought this book when I first got my IP. I love how America’s Test Kitchen pays attention to the details. I have to admit that the first time I did more than just leaf through it was just recently. I wanted to make shrimp and was looking for a new recipe. I don’t make rice because my husband has problems with it. To my delight, there was a recipe using Orzo! Turned out really well. I plan to try other recipes as well.


J&J
TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
5.0 out of 5 stars Top 5 Cookbook
Reviewed in the United States on December 19, 2019 Vine Customer Review of Free ProductWhat's this? )
I am virtually speechless... at how Amazing this book is, for All.
I mean, it's America's Test Kitchen, which if you don't know,
has made a living out of literally testing everything, in a kitchen, from appliances to recipes to store bought items.
If you want to know the best store bought chili mix to the best butter to bake with, ATK has tried it out.
They have a show on PBS around 8pm if you want to hunt it down.

So when they make a cookbook, and there is a new edition every year, you can trust it's right.
And this Instant Pot version is. Oh so right.
I dare say, it qualifies as a "Desert Island" cookbook.
One of only 5 you'd need for the rest of your life & the rare good for gifting cookbook.

Too many details to cover so, I'll highlight my faves.
One, adding a hand towel under the cover after you quick release your grains, like rice or quinoa,
and resealing while it sits, makes professional quality fluffy rice move from side dish to main course.

Two, it's not just Instant Pot items.
Simple recipes, like salsa verde, pesto, tzatziki, and of course spices but,
for those you need grinder/ food processor.

The cooking times are spot on.
Including the beginning pages with a cheat sheet for grains, beans, vegs & proteins.
Even a trouble shooting guide if you're new to, Instant Pot or, just cooking in general.
Ps, the foil sling for the salmon was The Best salmon ever,
including my addiction to Costco's pesto salmon. As easy to clean up as well.

As a no meat eater, in a meat loving household (yes, I do seafood but that's it),
the recipes with chicken broth translated so easy by subbing veggie broth.
Yes, there is a recipe to make your own but, Walmart's brand of Organic Veg Broth is the best I tried.
Obviously, I tried a lot. It's the only one with a rich veggie flavor, not salt, pepper or carrots.
So for under $3 @ quart, that's my staple, not making my own.

This is a book rich with winter comfort foods, light summer fare and a wonderful variety of flavor.
But the best part, and No, it's not the quick ease of the Instant Pot, is
with America's Test Kitchen attention to detail, you can be confident, even as a novice,
your recipe will come out right the first time.
JnJ love
4.0 out of 5 stars America's Test Kitchen is the best
Reviewed in the United States on December 7, 2020Verified Purchase
I like how they explain why a recipe works and now I can use my instant pot more. the only problem I have with their recipes is some ingredients are hard to find or you might only use a small amount and be lefty with the rest and not use it. So I just omit some of those and it is fine.

Ladyfingers
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Of Both Worlds--Greek/Turkish/North African Cooking Made Easy In An Instant Pot
Reviewed in the United States on December 13, 2019Vine Customer Review of Free ProductWhat's this? )
I couldn't wait for America's Test Kitchen to combine one of my favorite ways of cooking with some of our family's favorite foods. Mediterranean Instant Pot is chock-full of one pot meals, and the ingredient range is diverse enough to satisfy anyone's palate. We love lamb--this cookbook allows me to experiment with different cuts. The first recipe we tried was perfect for our cold Michigan winter day--Moroccan lamb and lentil soup. The addition of harissa makes it wonderfully spicy, and no need to head out to the store to purchase. The recipe for this condiment is also included, as are many others like hummus, baba ghanoush, basil pesto and tzatziki.

One unique feature common to all America's Test Kitchen cookbooks is format--every recipe is fully explained, starting with an introductory paragraph explaining why it works and where to get ingredients, to ending with detailed recipe directions and beautiful photo accompaniments to assure mistake-free end results. I'm a seasoned cook--the recipes found in this book are as suitable for me as they are for beginners. Besides great Mediterranean meals, the beginning of the book is loaded with helpful tips about instant pots as well as successful rice, bean, vegetable and protein cooking methods.

I couldn't be more pleased with these Mediterranean recipes, and using an instant pot makes them almost effortless.
The extravagant one
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book with some superb looking recipes, but....
Reviewed in Canada on May 9, 2020Verified Purchase
Every single one of them seemed to include beans - which I intensely dislike - pasta or potatoes.
The latter I like but my husband and I are both diabetic, so guess what I am careful with and am trying - after nearly 20 years - to get him to cut back on: beans - which he loves - pasta and potatoes!
One person found this helpful

The Sunday Post #21-5

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimberly @ Caffeinated Reviewer. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

The Classics

When was the last time that you sat down and read a book that you consider a classic? I never cared for many of the books that are traditionally considered classic such as “Little Women” or “Great Expectations”. I did read others by way of Reader’s Digest. For me, nothing beats “Lord of the Rings”.

I own a box set of LOTR, but rarely get it out anymore. It’s physically heavy and a bit unwieldy. Then a few days ago, I found the box set on Kindle Unlimited! I’m in heaven! This is the first time I’ve started reading it in absolutely years.

Moral of the story? Take a search at your favorite retailer for a favorite classic book!

Weekly cup of Coco!

We love to have Coco sleep on the bed with us, but this was going a little bit too far! I stepped away from the bed to turn the lights off only to find that she stole my side of the bed!